Unsettled May pattern to bring showers (and some thunderstorms) to California

Filed in Uncategorized by on May 4, 2017 2,209 Comments

A warm spring so far; wet north, dry south

The last 60 days have been warmer than average across virtually all of California, especially in the south. (WRCC)

The last 60 days have been wetter than average in the north, and much drier than average in the south–especially south of Los Angeles. (WRCC)

The first half of spring has been rather warm across most of California, with temperatures ranging from slightly above average in the north to well above average in the south. The winter storm parade continued across Northern California right through most of April, but late-season precipitation has been rather meager indeed south of the Bay Area. Los Angeles and San Diego have both seen less than 25% of average precipitation over the past two months, though seasonal precipitation remains above average even across Southern California due to the heavy precipitation experienced during the heart of winter.

The season’s first real heatwave occurred this past week across much of California, and in some-cases brought record-breaking high temperatures for early May. It should be no surprise that melting of the prodigious Sierra Nevada snowpack is now well underway, and several rivers in snow-fed watersheds are currently near or above flood stage. Since temperatures are likely to cool substantially in the coming days, serious snowmelt flooding is unlikely in the near term. There is still a tremendous amount of water stored in the snowpack at high elevations, however, so a particularly intense or prolonged heatwave later in May or in early June could still pose a risk of more widespread snowmelt flooding.

 

Striking, high-amplitude atmospheric pattern developing across N. Hemisphere

An unusually “wavy” atmospheric pattern is currently evolving over the entire Northern Hemisphere, with significant implications for California weather over the next couple of weeks. The development of a pronounced and remarkably well-defined “wavenumber 6” pattern in the mid-latitudes has been a source of substantial interest in the meteorological community in recent days, and for good reason: this kind of atmospheric arrangement is strongly associated with slow-moving and sometimes extreme weather conditions as high-energy “kinks” in the jet stream become “stuck in place” across certain regions. For those of you wondering what the heck “wavenumber 6” even means, the explanation is actually rather straightforward: it literally refers to the number of complete atmospheric “ridge-trough” cycles across a particular latitude band. In other words, we know that a “wavenumber 6” pattern is in place just by counting the number of blue troughs (or red ridges) in the adjacent figure.

High wavenumber atmospheric patterns (n=6-8) have recently been of particular interest in the meteorological community due to their propensity to cause extreme weather events. “Wavy” atmospheric patterns tend to displace cold, dry polar airmasses toward the equator and warm, moist tropical airmasses toward the poles–and the strong thermal contrasts this creates are conducive to the development of alternating zones of heatwaves, cold outbreaks, and flooding rains (and that’s exactly what is expected to occur in the coming days across the Northern Hemisphere). Once in place, these patterns tend to remain “quasi-stationary”–exhibiting a high degree of persistence and moving very slowly (if at all). Recent evidence suggests that the frequency of high-wavenumber patterns has increased during the Northern Hemisphere warm season, which may be linked to rapid Arctic warming and the subsequent loss of sea ice. The Potsdam Institute has created an excellent, broadly accessible video on this topic for those interested in learning more.

Animation of persistent “wavenumber 6” pattern expected to develop over the Northern Hemisphere. (NCEP via tropicaltidbits.com)

 

Unsettled conditions across much of California; showers (& thunderstorms) likely

Cold mid-level temperatures will generate sufficient instability for thunderstorms across much of California this weekend. (NCEP via tropicaltidbits.com)

What are the California implications of the wavy, sluggish atmospheric pattern discussed above? Well, it appears that a fairly persistent trough will develop near the West Coast over the weekend, potentially persisting in some form for the better part of the next two weeks. This will bring much cooler temperatures to all of California, and occasional precipitation to much of the state at times. The initial event may be the most interesting, as a rather deep and cold low pressure system “cut off” from the main jet stream will develop directly over the California coast on Saturday. While this system will be rather moisture-starved, it will be associated with a fair bit of atmospheric instability by California standards due to some impressively cold mid-level temperatures for early May.

As a result, widespread mountain precipitation is expected statewide–including significant Sierra Nevada snowfall and perhaps even some snow accumulation in the Southern California mountains. Showers and even some significant thunderstorm activity are also pretty likely at lower elevations, especially across Southern California where the coldest air aloft will combine with slightly more moisture and favorable mesoscale dynamics. Some thunderstorms will also be possible across the Central Valley over the weekend. Just about the only spot that may miss out on the convective action entirely may be the Bay Area, where only isolated activity is expected. The good news is that the parts of California which have been quite dry in recent weeks–namely, the southernmost third of the state–will likely see fairly widespread (if modest) precipitation over the weekend. Some stronger thunderstorms may also occur, with heavy downpours and hail possible in isolated spots.

Significant precipitation will be possible across the Sierra Nevada and across most of Southern California. (NCEP via tropicaltidbits.com)

As is often the case with cut-off lows, there is some uncertainty regarding how quickly this system will move away from California. While the GFS moves the system out rather quickly, the ECMWF lingers the low pressure area over Southern California through Tuesday–continuing the chance of showers and thunderstorms. At this point, I’d bet on the slower solution…especially given the sluggish large-scale pattern over North America. By the middle of next week, Southern California will likely dry out, but the quasi-stationary West Coast trough may allow more precipitation to creep back across the northern part of the state. In fact, recent model ensemble runs suggest that an above-average likelihood of precipitation and relatively cool temperatures will continue through at least the middle of May.

Finally: for those who are interested, I will be giving a public talk (and Q&A session) on California weather and climate in Ojai on May 20. Details are available here.

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  • Jim

    Amazing mammatus sunset in New Mexico…..
    https://www.pscp.tv/MikeOlbinski/1OdKryYjzPAxX

    • Bombillo1

      From a practical standpoint, California does not receive catastrophic earthquakes but once every 40 years or so. I know there are emergency notices that can happen via cell phones but what percentage of the population would be in a position to even hear a 30 second advance warning? Any notification would necessarily be after the fact otherwise there would be daily warnings of 2.7 events when a warning would only be necessary from a supra 6.0 I am thinking. I know I never buy earthquake insurance even though my house is in an “earthquake prone” location. I don’t worry about it that much frankly.

  • Chris

    At 3:00pm today:
    San Jose 82
    Morgan Hill 96

    At 9:00pm
    San Jose 66
    Morgan Hill 58

    Typical daily summer phenomenon. Great sleeping weather by evening and great swimming weather midday.
    Love our amazingly unique micro-climates!

    • AlTahoe

      Growing up we had a two story house with no A.C. in Morgan Hill. I remember going to sleep with the upstairs being 100F at 10:00pm and with a box fan in the window. By morning the fog would roll in and it would be in the mid 50’s and you would need all of your blankets. The second my twin brother and I moved out my dad put in central A.C.. something something builds character. Lol

      • weathergeek100

        It’s interesting how some inland valleys experience this and others don’t. Obviously, distance from the ocean plays a factor but how mountain ranges and valleys are oriented can make all the difference between a sea breeze funneling through the valley and carrying fog in or the valley heat remaining through the night.

        I say this because I used to have family living in Morgan Hill and when I visited them, I would experience the exact same phenomenon you mentioned. However, I also lived in Walnut Creek and rarely experienced this. The marine layer had a tough time getting into Walnut Creek at the end of a heat wave and when it did, it would take its sweet time. Yet, we were only 15 mins away from Berkeley where the golden gate drenches that city in fog constantly. My conclusion to this was that southerly surges of moisture tend to end Bay Area heat waves very dramatically if you’re able to get that southerly breeze. Morgan Hill probably gets that from Monterey bay. In Walnut Creek, despite being not far from the coast, you have mostly hills and land to the south so you don’t get to feel that air conditioner so suddenly.

        The Bay Area microclimates are beyond fascinating.

        • inclinejj

          I’m 4 miles from the beach in Pacifica. While the beach can be fogged in it can be in the high 70’s or 80’s at my house. Old timers said when Westlake subdivisions were built in Daly City the Fog patterns changed.

        • Henry

          A southerly surge can reach Los Gatos if the marine layer is above the pass in the Santa Cruz Mountains along highway 17, which is 1800 feet above sea level. Occasionally in the summer Los Gatos will cool down before San Jose does. But when there is no southerly surge, or if there is only a weak one or the marine layer is shallow, Los Gatos is typically several degrees warmer than San Jose.

        • Tuolumne

          I get the impression that sometimes marine air can get to the Concord-Walnut Creek area via the Carquinez Strait. But that’s a lengthy path which has to slow things down.

      • When did you bug out? I moved my office to MH in 2010 and moved family here almost two years ago.

        • AlTahoe

          I moved out of my dads house to start working and living in San Jose in the summer of 1999!

        • Bombillo1

          When I was 7 years old my family moved. It was two years before I realized they weren’t coming back.

  • redlands

    Was 100 again Redlands, Ca – Southern Ca again — the 2nd 100 and above day for 2017

    • Pfirman

      Guessing you will have many more according to the hobgoblin of consistency.

      • Dan the Weatherman

        I am sure he will experience quite a few during the heart of summer, but late May is a little early for any consistent 100 degree weather for that area.

        • redlands

          I remember when I was still in High School in May of 1984 — it got up to 112 in Redlands — that’s hot !!!!

  • matthew

    On my trip down to Reno this afternoon I saw 87 on the car thermometer. Dropped down to 76 by the time I made it back to Gods country in the Shire. Will probably top 80 tomorrow.

  • K?ros


    While the Pfeiffer Canyon Bridge failure on the north end of Big Sur got the press, the real problem lies to the south. Slide at Mud Creek (near Gorda) went off the other day, still is apparently quite active, and it’ll be a very very long time before anyone drives up Highway 1.

    • Nathan

      tunnel time.

      • Jason Jackson Willamette

        That’s what I’m seeing. Wow, that whole mountainside just slide into the ocean. One wonders if there are any cars under that…

        We really live on unstable ground, don’t we? At least 101 lives.

        • K?ros

          the highways been closed there for months because of smaller slides so that wasnt a problem thankfully

      • Pfirman

        What would keep the tunnel stable in all that moving earth?

        • Nathan

          dwarves, silly.

          • Tuolumne

            Not after they get BBQ’d by the Balrog.

    • Pfirman

      Wow, massive.

  • When I was a kid I remember the heat up then the cool downs in a three to five day span happened often in late spring and summer in San Jose. Seems a little like the pattern again for greater SF Bay Area

    http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/total_forecast/getprod.php?new&prod=XXXAFDMTR&wfo=mtr

  • tomocean

    Couple of shots from 30,000 over Lake Tahoe on a flight to Las Vegas yesterday. Snow pack is still quite impressive. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/10d354835d937564e0c7f3bd9252ebe8a06287844ab7c38939c98425ba16b593.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/68c2f929fb96d2a8a5068a50aa2483707fc9900f18fa605186fdd0a502e168db.jpg

    It was cloud-free until Nevada, then there was a pretty thick cover. Think this wasn’t far from Tonopah.
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/b1657317688b4420060b569774b4832acfb8c85e93ee4cae79ec2d06725cdc44.jpg

  • Chris

    Trivia question:
    When was the last time we had below average SST off the CA coast???
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/f71dc44c6c5811af003b9fcaece09df153db8ed799fdd8048f70448b631a2641.png

    • Spring 2013

      • Chris

        Dingdingdingdingding……
        You win?

      • Bombillo1

        Great, the year our drought hit its nadir…

      • jstrahl

        Did the GOA look the way it does here?

        • 82/83 El Nino Baby (San Jose)

          This is not an apples to apples chart, but gives an idea. Looks different to me. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/6014e7f24c945556fa11b207c9870a58138d7c956307047fda5b9f7f7c5718e1.png

          • jstrahl

            I suspected as much. So, extrapolating from 2013 to the present may be quite inaccurate.

          • AlTahoe

            I am having a hard time coming up with Analogs for next winter as nothing is matching up right now. I am going to wait until Sept before I start looking again.

          • jstrahl

            Once again, i’d say that there are no analogs. We are in unchartered waters due to global climate change. Everything is different.

  • Showing SWE difference between May 23, 2011 and May 23, 2017. A few places have more SWE than 2011 now. I’m curious to see these comparisons as far as high elevations as melt season progresses through June. Also graph showing difference in SWE comparing both years which to me suggests there is quite a bit more SWE at high elevations this year to be close to 2011 in Central and Southern Sierra.
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/57f0bd5ef33db7cf79f048c59481be2833a3e358ef8617121bd99040fb88a913.gif
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/2f959d62f017f195cdce9ab76f3a58bb0d67e9332baa631180fa0071590d7d87.jpg

  • In response to recent site issues (including downtime, irritating advertisements, and etc.), I’m going to try something new. I’ve set up a Patreon account that will allow blog readers to make voluntary contributions toward the substantial and rapidly growing costs of site hosting/maintenance. Don’t worry; Weather West is not moving toward a subscription model: all content will always remain freely accessible to all. But if even a small subset of readers are able/willing to subsidize a better site experience for everyone, I might be able to substantially reduce advertisements on the site. Thanks, everyone, for your continued support!

    https://www.patreon.com/weatherwest

    • gray whale

      Awesome!!!

      Heading over to donate. Now I don’t have to feel guilty for using an ad blocker 🙂

    • Steve Lutton

      I’m in.

  • rob b-Truckee/East Bay

    Note really directly weather related but it looks like former site sponsor Bloomsky just soft launched an Amazon Echo skill for their devices. Seems to work well but is missing the ability to change between devices. But you can ask temp, humidity and wind speed if there’s a storm connected to the device.

  • inclinejj

    Tioga Pass:

    • TBinRC

      Was just at Glacier Point. Tons of snow there, I can only imagine the Tioga area has more. Wouldn’t surprise me if the road isn’t open until the 4th.

      • Danlyle (Mariposa)

        7/7/17, my guess

  • happ [Los Angeles]

    11AM L.A. DOWNTOWN SUNNY 79 59 50 W8 29.92S
    NOON L.A. DOWNTOWN MOSUNNY 70 58 65 W9G17 29.96R

    Strong marine influence; 9F drop USC

  • molbiol

    First 100 degree day of the year here in Lancaster! 🙂

  • matthew

    Cracked 80 for the first time this year here in the shire (east end of Truckee).

  • alanstorm

    Currently 97°in Ukiah, interior Mendocino Co.

    • Bombillo1

      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/9cb37c1f8ec10fc862a3bc2b127dccbcacb16fffe96010cfb1dcb82f16d3cd2d.jpg

      Not any better here at 2400′, 50 mi N of Redding.. Hit 94, down to 93 now. Going to have a 15 degree cool off in the next 48 hours after which it will still be 5 degrees above “normal”. Here’s home on Feb 18th, uh, like 90 days ago..Sheesh

      • alanstorm

        5 degree drop would be perfect.
        So much better then where we were same time last year with such uncertainty & quickly browning fauna.
        Everything looks super vibrant for once!

  • T’storm98 (Orcutt, CA)
    • Great Winter of 2017 (SMC)

      I’d take those temperatures and coastal fog for the summer, I know others would!

    • DelMarSD

      Very similar weather here.

  • Yolo Hoe
    • Jason Jackson Willamette

      Thanks for sharing!!

    • Tuolumne

      Huntington Lake and Shaver Lake (Fresno County) are visible in the first two photos, with the White Mountains on the very far horizon.

      In the third photo, Tenaya Lake is still frozen!

      • Yolo Hoe

        Thanks for the lake ID’s.

        Return flight path this afternoon was further west and the mountain/canyon views were less dramatic.

        That said, views of the foothills reservoirs were highly satisfying — the entire state is brimming with surface water for the first time since we emigrated in July 2013.

        • Pfirman

          Emigrated, immigrated….who cares among friends?

    • Danlyle (Mariposa)
      • Tuolumne

        I picked 7/3 a while back. Eight to ten feet of very wet and heavy snow still on the ground at 8000 feet!

        • Danlyle (Mariposa)

          It’s possible that you have assumed that federal workers will forfeit their holiday weekend. I think not. Do not assume that Caltrans’s oft maligned work ethic is less than other agency’s.

          • Tuolumne

            That decision would be made by management. Caltrans had employees working over the last weekend on Sonora Pass: https://www.facebook.com/Caltrans-District-10-119234288129759/. The Park Service has a *lot* of employees working on weekends, especially holiday weekends, due to the number of visitors.

          • Danlyle (Mariposa)

            I guess my point is that if Caltrans controlled it, Tioga Pass and California Highway 120 would on average likely open at least 2 weeks earlier. The safety risks and snow removal obstacles are substantial. This year is way off the charts, regardless of who is responsible for removing the piles of snow. It’s a question of mission and motivation.

          • Tuolumne

            “It is certain that the people responsible for removing snow from
            Yosemite’s high country roads sit at the same table with others that
            wish snow were allowed to melt naturally.”

            It’s certain? Do you have evidence for this? In any case, the field workers and their field supervisors are in jobs where they generally work in the field, not sitting around at tables. The managers responsible for funding and overseeing these efforts are not supervised by some nature-loving interpretive rangers.

            Part of the mission of the National Park Service, incorporated into their founding legislation, it to render the parks available for public use. The Park Service also gets a lot of pressure every year to open the Tioga Road as early as possible and keep it open, due to the dramatic economic benefits for Mono County.

            That said, I’ve heard complaints that park management is too risk-averse regarding keeping the road open. OTOH, they lost a worker working on road clearing some years ago due to an avalanche. They also had a very bad experience a few years ago, when they had the road open very late in the fall and an ice storm caused numerous accidents, some serious. A balancing act is required and I’m not saying they always get it right.

      • weathergeek100

        Wow. It’s probably going to start snowing in September before all of that snow melts. Sheesh!

        • Tuolumne

          That’s more or less what happened in 2011. Lots of leftover snow in the really high country and fresh snow on top of it in October. Ditto in some other big years like 1983.

    • Pfirman

      Wow. This plane ride followed a bike ride?

      • Bombillo1

        Just so long as the plane ride does not follow a scuba dive…

    • Bombillo1

      Why are they blowing the snow to the uphill side? Is this a “make a good gig last longer” event?

      • Amy Cohen

        Because the hill faces south = melts faster? Just a guess.

        • Bombillo1

          Answer: because there is something on the downhill side of the road that they did not want to bury/damage. Just checking to see who here might have had some time on equipment. I have a PTO operated auger style blower on my tractor and have to make that call every 50 meters even though it should always go to the downhill side..

          • Tuolumne

            I’ve heard of ice chunks going through windows due to snow equipment goofs. Not good.

      • I’m gobsmacked that you asked this question.

      • Pfirman

        Nah. It is called ‘mulching’ to preserve water loss.

        • Tuolumne

          Is preserving water loss the opposite of avoiding water loss? 😉

          • Pfirman

            I meant prevent. Sorry. Got my message stuck in the bottleneck.

          • Tuolumne

            I often get messages stuck in the bottleneck of my mind.

    • Beth_ElDoradoHills

      My granddaughter volunteered as Tribute for District 10 – wishing her all the odds and favor

  • redlands

    3rd day in a row with temps of 100 and above — reached 102.3 at 130pm – appears that the marine layer/sea breeze kicked in — still had 2/3 hours more to heat up — could of been hotter — Redlands, Ca — Southern Ca 5/23/2017

    • Bombillo1

      Now I understand why they named it Redlands.

      • Pfirman

        I think it is the red clay earth caused the name, but I used to visit relatives there as a youth…..mostly in the summer and usually quite reluctantly.
        Would you trade Long Beach for Redlands?

        • Bombillo1

          No.

          • Pfirman

            Back in the day Long Beach was called a ‘cemetery with lights’ by some wag and the parks were known for their ‘Iowa’ picnics. I spent fifth grade through high school there, and then some. Only pass through these days.

  • Rainmaker (San Jose)

    This site is fascinating to monitor. Such power this planet yields. Watching the winds shift all over the place. I think the high pressure system that gave us this heatwave is collapsing right offshore of San Francisco. Looks like another rise in temps 5-6 days out.
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/870b541e67f069bc685f816ff3d654a13344a2b2376a0d5cebd4dec889008690.png

    • Jason Jackson Willamette

      Thank you as always Rainmaker, for sharing, for feeling that we are a part of a vast and interconnected reality.

      Our precious planet may have found her human voice long ago through one John Muir.

      “Everybody needs beauty as well as bread, places to play in and pray in, where nature may heal and give strength to body and soul.
      When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the universe.
      The power of imagination makes us infinite.
      When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world.”

      And then, when we contemplate our place in the great scheme of things, it’s best to accompany it with the appropriate music.

      Cloud Atlas Finale

    • Pfirman

      Link?

    • There’s a lot you can do there and some info is archived more than 5 years.

  • Bombillo1

    Daniel needs to make the pitch for public support the day before the first major storm of the year. Not during the 3 comments a day season. Timing is everything.

    • No reason not to start now–it’ll still be there once things pick up in the fall. 🙂

      • Pfirman

        Guess I could change my handle to Benny Factor. Maybe an upgrade in the future. Starting small.
        Please get back to us on how we are doing.

      • Bombillo1

        Just provoking you a bit. Not a bad time to start transitioning that way. I’m waiting for our season to end and the last customers to depart, in case anyone was wondering about my obvious indolence.

      • Steve Lutton

        You need to have an option for one payment by check for those that don’t want to use a credit card and be dinged monthly.

  • Great Winter of 2017 (SMC)
    • Jason Jackson Willamette

      Yes, exactly. Lots of posts with photos of the mountain greenery, but the neighborhood yards, trees and gardens are also so ALIVE right now throughout my area. I drove up to the Stanford University area to visit my brother who’s in the hospital, and detoured into the old neighborhoods. All I can say is the gardeners and tree trimmers are going to have a very busy summer…. Water is LIFE!

      • Bombillo1

        There used to be a stately old building in Sac, near the river, that had this inscription: Withsoever Goith The River, There Shall Be Life. Maybe Moses, or at least Charlton Heston said it.

        • Jason Jackson Willamette

          Whoever should be credited, they knew. All civilization began along the shores of the world’s oceans, lakes and rivers. The average adult human body is 50-65% water. We are birthed from a sack full of it. We can no more separate ourselves from our source as the whole can exist without its parts.

        • inclinejj

          Mark Twain said:

          Whiskey was made for drinking

          Water was made for fighting over

        • Pfirman

          The building is still there.
          “And Everything Shall Live Whithersoever the River Cometh” Ezekial 47:9

          • Bombillo1

            Charlton Heston was more eloquent.

          • Bombillo1

            Ezekial? Don’t you mean a Catholic Priest that came along about 400 years after all these things/people were supposed to have happened?

            Sorry, these slack weather episodes must take a portion of the blame here…

          • Pfirman

            I don’t know of whither you speak? Soever.

    • Dan the Weatherman

      The nasturtiums and sweet alyssum are looking healthy! ‘Tis the season for annuals in full bloom!

  • janky

    Signed up to give through Patreon. Thanks Daniel. WW is my addiction in the winter for snow in the sierras!

  • Howard Goodman
    • Bombillo1

      I’m most concerned about that voltage getting below 12.5. It was an incredible season. Bummer it is all over.

  • xeren

    FANtastic.

    “The proposal not only reduces investments in weather forecasting technology, but also cuts programs that would enhance understanding of phenomena, such as El Nino, hurricanes and tornadoes. NOAA’s weather satellite programs would see reductions in the hundreds of millions of dollars.”

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/capital-weather-gang/wp/2017/05/24/white-house-budget-aims-to-slow-gains-in-weather-forecasting-shocking-weather-community/

    • Bombillo1

      Seems like a reasonable trade-off. NOAA can start using The Farmer’s Almanac and Mr. Orange gets a new Citation Jet.

      • Jason Jackson Willamette

        Or a Lockheed Electra 10E….

    • Way at the bottom “While alarming to many in the weather community, several people familiar with the budget process said the cuts are dead on arrival. Congress’s proposed budget for NOAA included only a 1 percent cut.”

      Here’s a link from Cliff Mass giving an overview of NWP

      http://cliffmass.blogspot.com/2016/06/us-numerical-weather-prediction-is.html

      excerpt:

      But it is worse than that. A private sector firm, Panasonic, has gone into the global weather prediction business using the US global model (GFS) as a starting point. Panasonic scientists have worked on fixing some of the obvious weaknesses in the U.S. modeling system and report they have dramatically improved the forecasts over National Weather Service performance (GFS model). They claim that their forecasts are not only better than the official US GFS model, but nearly equal to that of the vaunted ECMWF.

      • Jason Jackson Willamette

        We’ll see.

        • I agree yet it keeps ringing bells what a for-profit company can do.

          • Jason Jackson Willamette

            The private/for profit sector invests into things it thinks long term can improve the bottom line. That’s not always the best motivation for services that affect the commonwealth. Take the Banking/Investment sector as an example….

      • Bombillo1

        I am a believer in the power of the private sector. One only needs to look at the Human Genome Project to see how private sector scientists can goose the public sector scientists with the resultant product much more advanced.

        • And don’t forget Space-X.

          • Bombillo1

            I am a little frustrated by the Space thing which seems to be more of a contest as to whose reproductive organs are larger. Craig Venter and the Human Genome project was a great drama, maybe to be a movie some day!

          • They get it done with less $$$ and less time. I’m not sure if any of their work has government assistance. If not then I have a hard time knocking it. It’s something NOAA has tried and failed or not been able to finish. They have brought things to the ISS. Vertical landings look like a SciFi movie? We should get together with a bottle of scotch sometime

          • Bombillo1

            A bottle would be a decent start. Much to hash out.

      • Bob G (Gustine)

        Thoughts on the latest SSTs In the Eastern Pacific?

        http://www.tropicaltidbits.com/analysis/ocean/cdas-sflux_ssta_global_1.png

        • They can change on a dime. I think cooling on the west coast is good. It’s still warm in a lot of places.
          How was harvest? I’m munching on some crisp sweet ones now. Grew up with some 3 black tarts in the backyard but I’m eating bings. I forgot what variety you grow??

          • PRCountyNative

            Don’t like the water temp?

            Wait a day.

            This was too easy to find, first try:

            https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/872dcfe3e3d8daf3eb0dcf6004ce6ed5ac6eccb422a3421e69c9c863560e99fd.png

            https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/5be386d5e0e1b0b72906079684e75fee2f3e0914e419a996de976ccaf6f723c7.png

            The wind changed (direction) and the water temp went up 3 degrees in 12 hours. 46026 SF buoy

          • Those buoys measure at the surface or 2 meters depth?

          • PRCountyNative

            Gosh I’m not sure. Most of the time the first 6 feet is all about the same, and what I feel matches well with what the buoy shows. The water 20 feet down won’t change (anytime soon) with a change in wind direction. The zone I float around in changes drastically quickly with most wind changes – changes on a dime!

            Anyone know – what depth do our buoys record temp at?

          • The ones that are part of EQ Pacific Buoy array measure at 1m and way below. The buoys off the west coast are between .4 and .6 meter below surface. http://www.ndbc.noaa.gov/

          • PRCountyNative

            Thank you for finding that!

          • Bob G (Gustine)

            We grow coral champagne with Brooks as pollenizers. Black Tarts are the old old variety used as a bing pollenizer. Packout this year not very good. A lot of sutures

          • Pfirman

            I have two cherry trees, one Lapins on which nothing set and one Stella, of which I ate two cherries. Good though.
            Good bloom, but bad weather at the time.

          • Bob G (Gustine)

            How old are the trees? The weather should not have affected it that much. I am familiar with both of those home gardener varieties

          • Pfirman

            Three on the Lapins and four on the Stella. I am trying the newish Zaiger Pluerry as a compromise for sure fruit.

          • Bob G (Gustine)

            Those trees are still very young for fruit production. Some of the dwarfing rootstocks set fruit sooner but I don’t like them

          • Pfirman

            Semi-dwarf. I would have to look up the rootstock, but I will go with your notion. The first year for both was promising and pretty much zilch since. I have to confess some big Sycamores do steal some of their sun.

          • Bob G (Gustine)

            If they were labeled semi-dwarf as a home garden variety, my guess is it is either a Colt or Mahaleb rootstock. Those will produce earlier than the standard Mazzard rootstock which are slow to produce. So a couple of more years you should start to get some fruit

      • Pfirman

        Almost a year old. Anything hopeful yet?

  • happ [Los Angeles]

    Very pleasant 77F under high clouds as cool down begins. Hoping for drizzle/ light shower before the end of May.

  • Bombillo1

    Am I seeing a strange little system coming up the coast and about to impinge Santa Cruz/Monterey?
    http://www.goes.noaa.gov/dml/west/nhem/weus/rb.html

    • Jason Jackson Willamette

      Hmmm, heat wave breaker. Could bring some showers.

      Want to Sing in the rain?!

      Florida’s your place this afternoon…

      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/f745a73f867ce097cd5e02d97445ea3a3c95613558c72402c740c0cadfa32c35.png

      • weathergeek100

        That’s drought relief for them. They’ve been so dry lately. I heard the natural grasses have been browning up there.

    • inclinejj

      My rain gauge has shown rain for the last 3 days.

    • Bob G (Gustine)

      We had cloud cover this morning that reminded me of tropical storm remnants

    • Jim

      There are some tropical looking clouds to the south from Scotts Valley

    • PRCountyNative

      Like 8 kinds of clouds on my home way home just now. Lots of mid level stratus, altostratus, cirrus up there. Some vertical development.

      1800′ Northern Santa Lucia’s, feels dry. Looks a little tropical though.

  • Fairweathercactus

    Hard to imagine any clearing on Thursday. The NAM forecasts an
    afternoon onshore push of 11.2 mb which if true would be the
    highest observed in the month of may since the turn of the
    century. More than likely the gradient will be around 10 mb
    onshore which is still strong enough to keep the clouds over the
    area and advisory level gusts in the Antelope Vly. Max temps will
    continue to fall esp in the vlys and the interior and most Max
    temps will be 8 to 12 degrees blo normal.

    • Great Winter of 2017 (SMC)

      What is that in inches of mercury?

  • mattzweck
    • Pfirman

      Is sort of breezy like a little bit pregnant?

  • Admode (Susanville)
    • Admode (Susanville)
      • Nate

        Crater Mountain?

        • Admode (Susanville)

          Yep! So here’s an even tougher one, what mt were these pics taken from? (Not the tracks).

          • Nate

            Harvey Mountain!

          • Pfirman

            I envy your sense of domain.

          • Admode (Susanville)

            Yes! Must be from around these parts, eh?

          • Nate

            Not really…just good at matching up patterns on Google Maps 🙂

          • Admode (Susanville)

            Cheater!:)

      • Scap

        Hatchet mountain

        • Admode (Susanville)

          Nope.

        • Admode (Susanville)

          Hatchet is covered in windmills now.

    • TheNothing

      First picture is Shasta and the second is Lassen?

      • Admode (Susanville)

        Yep!

        • Pfirman

          I was about to get it backwards. Thanks for Nothing setting it straight, heh.

    • happ [Los Angeles]

      bear prints?

  • annette johnson

    ”Tis the season for hot weather to begin. 110 degrees, 6% humidity and 20 mph winds today in Lake Havasu City. High clouds today made for a pretty sunset tonight. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/bfc98546bb82936cc55e8418a1298bb33a9e95b7c2d723385805b476a4163978.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/89674738b8439e7ae2a2e22ad8c85b86d86332a35626d8cb68b3b464072bb82c.jpg

    • Pfirman

      Well, you know your seasons, but we here in the lower Sacramento Valley just got a nice reprieve from heat, and it will last a few days or so.

      • annette johnson

        We are supposed to get a reprieve the next couple of days as well…if there is anything positive about 110 degrees, it’s that it makes the 90’s feel pretty darn good?

    • Nathan

      Kind of a dumb question, but how …. what…do you actually do all summer? Like how can one even live when it gets to be 100-110 literally every day? Is it just all AC, all the time?

      • weathergeek100

        Most of the country bakes in heat and humidity during the summer. If it’s not 110, it’s 90 with very high humidity that makes it feel like 110. Ask the majority of Americans. People who grew up in coastal CA and have never lived anywhere else (like me) don’t really know what a normal summer feels like. I ask the same question when I visit the east coast in summer. We’re spoiled here.

        • annette johnson

          I would take the dry desert heat of 110 over a humid 90 degree day in Texas anytime!

          • Pfirman

            Amen to that, having lived in Cincinnati until fourth grade. I visited as an adult one summer and the word stultifying was invented for that. I came back to Sacramento Valley 110F, put on a pair of shorts and did some massive pruning all day. In Cincy I did not want to move a muscle.
            I used to haul hay and stacking up high in the barns it would be about 140F. Sliding down the elevator rail into mere 110F was like entering a refrigerator.

          • redlands

            Annette – am sure you have heard of Needles, Ca — Well when I was a kid 10-12yrs – my family started on a trip – pulling a trailer and got to Needles around 12 midnight – it was at least 100 to 105 — it was real miserable to sleep in 100 degree weather. Its hard to sleep in hot n dry and or hot n humid. — both bad for sleeping. Its way too hot when Vaseline in a jar is almost liquid — which happened this summer when our ac died of old age – from temps up to 116

          • annette johnson

            Oh, yes, good old Needles. Too bad you didn’t get to take a dip in the river…the water is very cool there. 100 degrees is WAY to hot to sleep in. Lol, I just went through our vehicles to make sure there weren’t any lip balms or lotions. Anything like that will liquefy in this heat! AC units always seem to die in the middle of summer. Ours is about 25 years old but our AC guy still assures us it’s in good shape. Fingers crossed.

          • Tuolumne

            Been to Alabama in August with 90/90 weather, and Dallas area in July with 107 at 50%. The latter was much preferable, if still worse than truly dry heat.

        • Nathan

          yeah, I get that, but 110-115 just seems like a whole other level…I’ve been in both, and 90 and humid and it’s kind of a dull, lethargic heat while 110 to me was just searing and painful.

      • annette johnson

        Not a dumb question because I know it is hard for a lot of people to understand why we choose to live in the heat. Yes, it is AC all the time. 24/7. You go from your air conditioned house to your air conditioned car to air conditioned work or shopping. In between, you are like “damn, it’s HOT”. Luckily we have the river and the lake and activities for most people revolve around that. It is actually an incredible feeling being out on the lake when it is 115 and jumping in the water. No towel needed lol. The monsoon in July and August can make things pretty uncomfortable but then we can look forward to some intense storms.

        • inclinejj

          Do people out there have lights in the back yard to garden at night. I’ve seen that in Vegas and Phoenix. Growing up on the coast 15 minutes from San Francisco I couldn’t stand the heat. The cold you can dress for but not much you can really do, in the heat. I worked on summer in Sacramento rehabbing a 30 unit apartment building. That summer was the record for most days over 100 degrees. It was insane.

          Like Johnny Carson always used to joke about, but it’s not humid in California.

          Does your house have solar panels? Does the electric bill look like a House payment?

          • Hardcort

            I grew up along the coast just outside SF and once I had the taste of heat I could never go back. We lived in Folsom for 20 years. We closed all the windows before leaving for work and the AC came on at 4pm. Around 7 pm we opened all the windows and turned off the AC. In the summer, a breeze usually develops late in the day and cools down from 100 to the mid60’s by morning. Typicslly, maybe twice in the summer, the heat locks down for a week, maybe more and there is no real cooling off at night. You need a pool.

          • annette johnson

            I would have to say most activities are done early in the morning. In mid summer, temps can remain close to 110 even at 9 pm. Many of those that have to work outdoors (construction workers) arrive at 4 am and finish up by noon.
            Personally, I think it is all about acclimation and staying hydrated. I don’t go anywhere without a large jug of cold water in summer. Hydration is key.
            I personally do not have solar at my house, although it is becoming much more common. The initial investment is still pricey, although it does pay for itself within 10 years or so. Our local high school has a hundred or so “covered” parking spots that students can pay extra for. The “covers” are solar panels. I’ll attach some pics later.
            My highest electric bill last summer was probably around $300. During the day we keep the house around 78 and bump it down to 75 at night. Ceiling fans work overtime!

          • PRCountyNative

            What does it cost you for a kilowatt-hour? Payback is more like 4, maybe 5 years, savings are astronomical. So long as you don’t sign a lease.

          • annette johnson

            I should have been in the loop a little more when I made the 10 year assumption. The last person I talked to at length about solar did sign a lease. It must be getting more affordable as I am seeing many more houses with it. We pay 9.25c /KWh with the commercial rate a penny cheaper.

          • redlands

            how much does a solar cost ???? 15-20,000 ???

          • PRCountyNative

            This weather forum probably isn’t the best place to get into money details… $2 – $3 per watt net cost.

          • inclinejj

            $300 is not too bad considering you probably have the AC running a lot.

          • annette johnson

            It really isn’t but thankfully the house is only 1600 sq ft or so, and yes, the AC probably won’t be turned off until October. Then again, it’s all relative because wages are not very high here.

        • Staying on PST helps with those morning activities 🙂

          • Tuolumne

            The first time I drove into Arizona as an adult I was flummoxed because the time didn’t change despite crossing a time zone boundary. What the ???? Several years later I finally found out what the deal was.

        • redlands

          Whats the hottest its gotten there — u have your own weather station/thermometer ??? — I’ve recorded 116 at my station this June-2016 in Redlands, Ca — Southern Ca — Although our local paper — Redlands Daily Facts – who begin recording weather stats since 1920 – recorded 118 July 2006 —

  • inclinejj
  • Since there is nothing to talk about. Here is November’s precip anomaly. 🙂

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/39211cea86e05b444da4482a556a0b9441679d1d872073f29d3e4359eff3a18c.gif

  • Tazmanian

    1st major heat wave of the season with area wide high 100 too 110 in most areas this was the 0z GFS run

    http://www.tropicaltidbits.com/analysis/models/gfs/2017052500/gfs_T2m_swus_49.png

    • AlTahoe

      I am willing to bet that the GFS has over done that heat wave at hour 336. What is interesting though is it has Sacramento at 106F and South Lake Tahoe at 78F. I have noticed this with early season heatwaves before. Tahoe doesn’t warm up nearly as much as it would later in the summer. If it were August, 106F in Sacramento would be about 90-92F up here. But like with the heat earlier this week where Sacramento was 101F we only made it up to 75F. Not sure why the lowland heat doesn’t translate up here in the month of May or early June.

  • Great Winter of 2017 (SMC)

    Didn’t know that Weather West gets 250,000 page visits a month, after reading that Patreon. Must have got near a million in the blog post that got 10,000 comments!

    • Bombillo1

      Should be more. 38 million living here and about 500 of us are curious enough to check in. How many are looking at a stupid ass Facebook page?

      • Pfirman

        Um, how long ago?

      • Jason Jackson Willamette

        Have to go visit Politico to check…..

  • tomocean

    You can see a very thick marine layer that has pushed well into the foothills east of Sacramento. The inferno of July and August await, but what a nice break in the heat for the next few days! https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/f08b461c56e1f774ee01039e24717597cc0513f0ce1adbf4aea756ef7b8373ce.jpg

    As an aside, anyone ever see a wood pecker feeding at a hummingbird feeder? https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/770706d279eb47641efd30f84f69d9a97996256d263aef52e3fa0284ba2eb398.jpg

    • Jason Jackson Willamette

      The winds have been screaming starting around sunset last night and still continue here in San Jose. Leaves everywhere, and with the wind chill it is very cool. We’ll enjoy the cool down while it lasts –

      • PRCountyNative

        And it’s all a factor of wind direction…

        On average it’s been a lot windier in recent weeks than it has been the last couple days, and right now.

        But, the vast majority of the time we have been, and are under a NW wind regime. Occasionally, and especially at the tail end of intense heat waves, the wind switches to south for a couple days.

        Suddenly, everyone who lives in a NW wind protected area, and is feeling the lighter south wind, declares “My it’s suddenly so windy!”.

        Santa Cruz for example is just about totally NW wind sheltered. But the south wind blows right into town, and up the mountains, leading to heavy drizzle/light rain, like last night, just from having the fog blow uphill and thru the trees.

        While 1/2 the people declare “It’s windy”, the other half are declaring “Thank goodness the wind finally stopped” at the exact same time.

    • honzik

      Can Confirm. Heavy fog and drizzle at the 2000 ft level in the SCMtns. Ground wet. Lots of fog drip from my neighbors pine and cedar trees.

      BTW, what’s John Curtis’ hypothesis: Heavy Summer Fog = Light Winter Rain? Other way around? I ask because we’ve had a few heavy fog events already, and that strikes me as unusual.

      • jstrahl

        A bunch of times this hypothesis did not play out.

      • Tuolumne

        Heavy summer fog = lots of hot air. 😉

    • happ [Los Angeles]

      Solid overcast in LA could produce a max below 70F for the first time 8 days when the last ULL occurred.

    • Nathan

      That’s Darryl.

    • inclinejj

      No but I’m hearing wood peckers in Pacifica. First time in years!

  • 805 Weather (Camarillo)

    This was a fun boom-pause-roll 3 stories up & 9 miles away… This area & out east of the Channel Islands have been seeing consistent 3.0+ over the last 7 years. & they almost always feel the same if you’re up in a building. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/9018f6b660d23566758f555de5e9af83a68ef229c7c83457ec8de012775bf335.png

    • Bombillo1

      So would our new earthquake warning system have screened that one out? I just don’t know, on a practical level, how this is supposed to work. So was this a preshock to the big one or just another yawner?

      • Nate

        I don’t know the exact details, but there’s probably some sort of threshold with the system, i.e. x stations have to exceed y acceleration value for a warning to be sent out. A quake this size wouldn’t cross that threshold, so yes, it would be screened out. The earthquake early warning system is already pretty well established, and it’s in use by BART, in addition to having worked with the 2014 Napa and La Habra earthquakes. We have most of the seismic stations needed and the computing power to process and interpret their data, so while it’s a big jump for preparedness, it’s definitely something that can be implemented practically in the near future.

        • Bombillo1

          How would it be known if this was a pre-shock to a latent 6.5 event? If you had a 15 second warning, that maybe 10% of the people actually received, would this be of material help? I am sincerely wondering about this and do not know how these issues are addressed.

          • Nate

            It’s an early earthquake warning–issued after the earthquake starts. As for whether this quake is a foreshock, that’s impossible to know unless a bigger quake happens after. 15 seconds is more than enough time to take cover, automatically shut off gas/power/water, stop sensitive procedures like surgery, open fire station doors, stop trains, and to prepare for strong shaking. 60-120 seconds of warning (which is entirely possible) would allow even greater countermeasures.

            I think 10% is way too low of an estimate, but even if that was the case, the payoff for successfully preventing a small portion of damage or loss of life in this subset of the public is far greater than the cost of this system.

            https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2014/3083/pdf/fs2014-3083.pdf
            https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/f35a95b23be15377e67b48462b4ca3a61ea58e52edb028b687cdf5000bbf5b4b.png

          • CHeden

            Just in case some folks may not know the concept, the early warning system relies on the fact that P waves (essentially sound waves) propagate faster (up to 2x faster!) than the more sluggish but damaging “S” (sheer) waves. Therefore, the farther you are away from the hypocenter, the greater the time differential between the arrival of the P and S waves.
            Once a “P wave” is detected at multiple stations, the hypocenter is nearly instantaneously determined. From that, and knowing the time differential until the S waves arrive, a warning can be issued that can be used to shutdown critical systems and trigger local alerts. Unfortunately, what this means is the closer you are to the hypocenter (along with the strongest shaking) the less time there is for any advanced warning.
            S-waves travel around 3-4km/sec in our neck of the woods, with P waves up to 2x that. This means that if you were 10 km from a particular hypocenter, the P wave would arrive in less than two seconds…which leaves at least a two second window for taking appropriate action before the beginning of the S-waves.

          • Tuolumne

            I don’t normally do spelling corrections, but that’s *shear* waves. They exert a shearing force on the ground and structures. The word “sheer” gives the wrong mental image since these waves can be anywhere from very large to very small.

          • CHeden

            you are correct!

          • Bombillo1

            Thanks for taking the time to outline the logic. I am always in favor of more science but was a bit skeptical that we were really there yet with earthquake prediction. I do think we are close with volcano analysis and their distinctive/signature seismic activity prior to eruption…

          • Candleman (Santa Barbara)

            It isn’t earthquake prediction. It warns you before the shaking hits your area, but the shaking has already started somewhere.

          • Nate

            It’s good that you’re wary of about earthquake prediction–hold on to that skepticism, as eq prediction is essentialy impossible! The USGS makes their stance on it pretty clear:

            “Can you predict earthquakes?

            No. Neither the USGS nor any other scientists have ever predicted a major earthquake. We do not know how, and we do not expect to know how any time in the foreseeable future.

            However, based on scientific data, probabilities can be calculated for potential future earthquakes.”

    • Great Winter of 2017 (SMC)

      We should get tornado sirens to get the publics attention!

  • Tioga Road update May 24, 2017
    Road crews are plowing from west to east and have reached the west end of the Olmsted Point avalanche zone (which is just west of Tenaya Lake). Avalanche conditions are currently unsafe, but may improve in the next few days. Safety is the top priority, so crews will wait until conditions are safe before plowing through the avalanche chute. Meanwhile, crews are widening the plowed lanes and performing road repairs elsewhere on Tioga Road.
    https://www.nps.gov/yose/planyourvisit/tioga.htm

    • Tuolumne

      There’s a lot of work besides clearing the traffic lanes on the main road – shoulders, turnouts, side roads, repairs, etc. I wonder if Tuolumne Meadows campground won’t open until late July.

  • Had a year-low barometer reading of 29.66 yesterday. Found it to be interesting for this time of year, but I also like not having to turn on the AC!

    • happ [Los Angeles]

      Agree. This nice cool down allows us from not using A/C

    • inclinejj

      Go A’s!

  • honzik

    Now that the rain season is coming to a close, the next thing on my radar is this year’s monsoon season. Will it be substantial, like in 2015, or a dud? Anything of interest in the long term modeling yet?

    • Where is everybody from SoCal and AZ today? I know Annette is scoping out possibilities for awesome sunsets. Maybe everyone else is stuck in traffic? LOL

      • annette johnson

        No great sunsets tonight but at least it didn’t break 100 today. Lower 90’s for tomorrow. So happy about that?

        • Tuolumne

          Too cold! 😉

  • 82/83 El Nino Baby (San Jose)

    Apparently there is more weather on Jupiter besides the big red spot.
    https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/a-whole-new-jupiter-first-science-results-from-nasa-s-juno-mission

  • 82/83 El Nino Baby (San Jose)

    You got to love the models. CFS high res says cooler than normal east pacific this summer. CFS low res says warmer than normal. I just do not understand how these models are useful at all. I might as well leverage the farmers almanac!

    https://twitter.com/TropicalTidbits/status/867769402531483649

    • The area between 20N and 20S is what really stands out to me. One is Nina the other is Nino. AFA the NH above 20N it almost looks like the resolutions are flipped.

  • Tazmanian
  • Tazmanian

    Sure did not take long for the grass too dry out at lest here

  • Charlie B

    Remember, it is not yet too late to join the first annual Weather West “Predict when Tioga Pass will open” contest. It is by honor system (even though there is no honor among thieves). The deadline is this Friday. I picked 6/25 (which is appearing sketchy). So if you haven’t joined do so now! The winner will get bragging rights and a gift certificate to “Uncle Tobias’ Hat Shoppe and Potsticker Palace.” Cap’n will be disappointed if he doesn’t win. (There is a backstory I think…..)

    • Tazmanian

      i think july 4th

    • Thunderstorm

      August 7th. Machinery breakdowns just like on gold rush. Failure to maintain with the big rush to open being the problem.

    • July 7th I said earlier I believe.

    • matthew

      Still sticking with 6/30. There will be a high level of motivation to have it open for the July 4th weekend.

    • Great Winter of 2017 (SMC)

      July 5

    • Pfirman

      I made a guess back when, but to prove it I have to search the particular Daniel post, which I don’t remember, but I think you have my date.

    • Tuolumne

      Earlier I picked July 3. This is an oddball date which assumes that they can’t get it open by June 30 for the weekend before July 4th, so they have to work over the weekend so it’s at least open for the 4th.

    • inclinejj

      Counselor. Can you put me down for 7-20.

      • roseland67

        Born on Friday, 13th in July, so I’ll go with that

    • AlTahoe

      I think I picked June 28th last time. I will stick with that as I like the surprise mid week opening.

  • Nate
    • Very windy and chilly in dow town Los Gatos right now.

      • inclinejj

        About 5:20 am a 49.8 mile per hour gust blew the neighbors plastic deck furniture all over the place. Pacifica.

        • TJH

          Pretty sure that was why I woke up then.

          • inclinejj

            I wish Glenn would post, the wind at his place is much higher then back here. A bunch of fences blew down in the wind the other night in Lower Linda Mar.

      • Henry

        There has been a strong southerly surge through the pass along Highway 17 in the Santa Cruz Mountains all day today. The high temperature this afternoon at Los Gatos RAWS was only 54 – quite astonishing for late freaking May. That is 14 degrees cooler than the high of 68 in San Jose.

    • Dan weather maniac

      Great picture! Summer fog season is here!

      55 in orinda with scattered stratus/fog …. I love it!

    • honzik

      The fog drip from the trees is so strong this morning at 2000′ up in the SCMtns, that is sounds like light rain.

  • annette johnson

    Got a few https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/fd8e415d04e256a570ba248746828a58981b08094d8107f3833d46f5f862ef21.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/7a832446602ffa2c6aacafeba23f5481896f0de589a64c9b535502d0e027921c.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/dcfb2580759a1ad8b20f11888b530d8d493d2b1d7cfebcf44051c7edd4fe1e01.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/c94f2b405bad494aae136b178ff3c105977c03d354c65ef3b3d2970c6c0a382e.jpg pics of some examples of solar energy being used here in Havasu. I really like the 2 fer 1 deal of having a shady place to park underneath solar panels. The school district is on the bandwagon having several different sites where this is utilized. My neighbor 2 houses down just had some installed.

    • redlands

      what did they run — cost -wise

      • filliamHmuffman

        Commercial carport solar like that usually runs $6/watt installed, from a rough count of the panels it was probably just under $1,000,000 (though from the job board it looks like it is some sort of lease/PPA agreement so no upfront cost to the school district).
        Residential rooftop solar is running about $4/watt installed, figure about $1000 per panel (this includes racking, inverters, labor, wiring etc…)

        • PRCountyNative

          Residential solar can be had for $3/watt now. From a cash flow perspective, solar can cost nothing, finance the system and savings are greater than or equal to cost from day one.

          • inclinejj

            If you lease the panels the company you lease them from gets the tax break. If you purchase the panels you get the tax break.

          • My panels should be up next month. I am hoping the heat is minimal until then. We purchased. The tax credit is too good to pass up and the utility bills only keep going up.

          • inclinejj

            Go A’s!!

          • annette johnson

            Where are you from?

          • Brentwood (NorCal)

        • annette johnson

          Thank you for helping out with that 🙂

      • annette johnson

        Sorry I didn’t respond earlier…I didn’t do my homework and did not want to provide misinformation. It looks like filliamHmuffman below has a pretty good grasp on the numbers.

    • click

      All the walmarts in my area of the high desert had those put in last year, and so did the local high school. Good stuff, better than a hot parking lot.

      • annette johnson

        That is awesome your Walmarts have them! Sure could use that here. Such a great concept.

  • Thirstier Nick (Santa Maria)

    Paso Robles was a wintry 62 for the high. Just a few days ago it was near 100.

    Santa Maria was actually 8 degrees warmer than Paso. We’re pretty much resistant to this cooling trend. What’s up with that?

    • Pfirman

      Thermal whiplash. So much fun.

  • Fairweathercactus

    Heavy drizzle on the cactus here in Whittier.

  • Tazmanian
    • Bombillo1

      Now that could be interesting.

      • Pfirman

        Heh, its already interesting, but it could get exciting.

  • Chris

    Unusually deep marine layer pouring over M Uminhum with two “waves” forming downwind as it descends towards San Jose to the right. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/440121cf3a0fe320c7020f7c90e9b95697786023c429837ce8e6652a4918c615.jpg

  • Arnold Weather Fanatic

    Thanks for the Marine Layer 🙂 . Temps bumping along n 70s and low 80s. Painting weather.

  • AlTahoe

    It was a frosty 33F on this mornings dog walk. Hopefully things start to warm up this weekend as I have turned my furnace off and now I won’t turn it back on till Oct based on stubbornness alone.

  • Sonora Pass and Ebbetts Pass estimated 3-5 weeks before opening. NPS won’t give an estimate for Tioga Pass.

    In 2011, Sonora Pass opened May 27th and Ebbetts Pass opened June 4th

    • The drive through Ebbetts Pass during the summer should be amazing. I wonder how long the snow will remain? Into July, at least, is my guess.

      • I’ve looped highways 4 395 108 and 49 and if you have the time this year would be an awesome year for it.

  • happ [Los Angeles]

    May Gray in charge just like it should. Yesterday was only 69F; today may be just as cool.

    • Craig Matthews

      Wonder how the Shasta-Trinity and southern Cascade drainages are going to handle the snowmelt?

      • Tuolumne

        The Shasta-Trinity area is mostly at relatively moderate elevations, despite the prominent mountains sticking up here and there, so I don’t think they have a huge amount of snow left to melt relative to the size of the watersheds. Check out the satellite photos after we have a snowy period and compare this region to the Sierra. The latter has much larger contiguous areas at fairly high elevations.

        • Tuolumne

          In fact, look at it today – very little areal extent of snow left.

      • CHeden

        All the rivers are on the way down, so no major problems expected.
        The Trinity’s flow is going to be raised to 11,000 cfs then slowly dropped, which should keep the entire lower river (and lower Klamath) cooler than in many years during this summer….but lousy for fishing for the time being.

  • Oroville Reservoir is now ~14 feet above spillway invert. They are blasting a few areas for equipment access and smashing the lower spillway and also blasting the chute clocks and area at the bottom of spillway. I think the concrete is pretty thick down there.
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/1b9bbf4ac385d13caab2b8d8312229719ffb50818f613fa11ae82b2052dd8f8b.jpg
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/454bb925545fe059520650e84b06716b1b209a41aba9b0e4d0ce10f8ff4fd769.jpg

    • happ [Los Angeles]

      How long can they rely solely on the alternative channel?

      • Tuolumne

        The only alternative flow path right now is the underground piping by the dam. The only alternate *channel* to the spillway being demolished and/or repaired is the emergency spillway, which can’t be used right now because the lake isn’t high enough.

      • Nathan

        ….about 7 months.

        • I still don’t know how low it will/can be drained.

          • I get they don’t have the spillway to use to drain, but it is 75 feet below capacity. Why is it so low? Do they think the snowmelt will be that significant to risk filling the lake? I think they’re being overly paranoid and it is a waste of lake space and water storage. The outflow from the dam has been above the lake inflow.

          • My guess is they want to get a reasonable or maybe paranoid level below flood pool capacity of 750,000 which they are already 250,000 acre feet below. Next guess is the will continue to drop until it gets to the invert elevation of spillway which is around 803 ft elevation before there’s a reduction in Hyatt release. It’s complicated with the ecosystem and habitat below the dam, too. I’m no expert but it’s my armchair guessing.

    • Pfirman

      The little flags in the second pic are festive.

      • Nathan

        Also looks like Wayne left his Hefty cooler in the blast zone.

        • It looks like the drilling went around the cooler. National Security reasons?

        • Pfirman

          Poor Wayne gets lost in his world too often.

    • Nathan

      Most remarkable to me in these photos is the near total lack of wear on the upper spillway, given ~50 years of releases, including the mega releases of this past winter, especially compared to the insane damage of the lower spillway.

      Really gives you an appreciation for the amount of force you get when you combine laminar liquid flow and -9.8m/s^2.

      • Pfirman

        The upper section has less gradient than the lower section, so the water has less acceleration and thus less potential to cause damage.

    • Dan weather maniac

      great pics….

      makes me think there just must be a better way to manage our water and create more win wins…

      central valley aquifer recharge / flood lowlawnds and soak in the water to the deep aquifers seems more sustainable than trying to maintain these massive dams.

      I think you need some dams and water control coming off the sierra for sure, but why not use natural gravity and the low lying central valley / basin for more water storage??

      • honzik

        I was looking up the cost of desalination and it looks like it’s about $0.50 per cubic meter or $1.41 per 100 cubic feet (HCF).

        Then I checked out the metered cost of water in LA and it runs at about $5.19 per HCF.

        It seems to me that desalination is on the cusp of widespread use for urban areas in Southern/Central California. In fact, a recent Scientific American article concludes that the Desalination Era Is Here, based on its widespread use in Israel.

        Related: I did speak with an Israeli expert on desalination, and he mentioned that the brine return to the ocean has to be engineered correctly to prevent any significant environmental damage. He also mentioned that one of the costs comes from adding back minerals to the desalinated water to make it suitable for widespread use.

        • Dan the Weatherman

          I wonder if some of the brine could be turned into rock salt by any chance (or any form of salt that can be used for something else) and lessen the amount that is returned to the ocean. This is something I often think about when the issue of brine being returned to the ocean comes up when I read about desalination.

          • PRCountyNative

            As soon as you handle it, or move it, it has cost you too much. And brine is not rock salt, more time and space (= money) are needed for that. The margins are very thin and the quantities vast. Like manually sequestering CO2.

          • All SoCal needs to do is make NorCal pay for it. The promise being SoCal won’t take any water from NorCal. Those on eastern Sierra will pay double to stop diversion away from Mono Lake. My tongue is planted in my cheek. I think. LOL-LA

        • Is that after construction? How big? (Million Gallons per Day?) one of the big issues when I lived on MRY Peninsula was where and how the discharge was going to be dispersed. Would it suck up too many fish? Would it destroy habitat over a broad area of dispersion. What depth? What temperature is discharge relative to depth of dispersion? There seems to be so many obstacles here as opposed to other countries. Now it seems if anything anywhere non-human that may be remotely affected there are high hurdles.

  • Craig Matthews

    Interesting pattern showing up on the ECMWF toward d-10. The model suggests heat/highest anomalies over PNW/Norcal and also leaves room for eddy formation, or mid-upper level Low formation to the sw of Socal. This set up, if it happens, could influence the alignment of thermal trough up the state and induce a southerly surge along the south central coast, keeping central coastal temps moderated throughout the heat event, while interior norcal gets hot. Will be intereting to see if a cut off Low would be strong enough to generate convection over the Sierra, if it forms at all. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/6ee3a35528335649e737f8e5ed46a8ff599d7c71e199c9b3ade5e7f1e2869e60.png

    • Bombillo1

      Didn’t we just do one of these? I am thinking Alanstorm is not too excited either. How about Santa Cruz or Point Conception take this one?

    • Chris

      I love southerly flow along the coast. Keeps our sea breeze here in Morgan Hill from the south off Monterey bay vs the north coming from polluted/hazy San Jose.

      • Craig Matthews

        Yeah that is interesting…Sometimes I notice San Jose will be warmer then Morgan Hill when a southerly surge is in effect. I remember one time flying into San Jose airport from LAX I got a chance to see the southerly surge and the Monterey Bay eddy, which was reversed from its usual eddy flow due to the up coast sse flow…was way cool to see from the air. When we landed in San Jose airport there was no wind, was very hazy, and temp was in the 90’s. Soon as we made it to south end of San Jose, the air quality suddenly got clear and we hit a pretty strong south wind. When we got to Gilroy temp was in the 70’s and could see the marine bank spilling through the Prunedale gap area.

        • Chris

          Classic!

      • San Jose’s haze gets blown in from the north and gets trapped too.

        • Chris

          Like today!
          Though it’s not awful

  • Pfirman
  • CHeden

    Note the two well defined eddy-lows near Cape Mendocino and the Bay Area. Both should maintain the cool temps near and along the coast for the next few days. Was hoping some moisture would get flung north, but no dice. Some pretty meager scattered Cu is all I can see over the northern mountains.
    At least temps are back to near “normal” at 81F today here in Cottonwood. Give it a week. I’ll be sweating bullets by then.
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/92f00270abc8864641730a49a8cd884af7e5dc66412d3cc82ae1d3cdd032b7ce.jpg

    • Pfirman

      I hope the West Coast can fend off Korean missiles as well as it can all that condensation.

  • Fairweathercactus

    This May weather takes me back to how I remember how Mays where in elementary and middle school. Lots of gray with a touch of mist or drizzle at times. It would be like this till around lunch and by lunch break the clouds would break up a bit. It was in high school when May weather started to get a little different. The nights got a lot warmer and we had very little low clouds and fog from 2002-2006.

    • Pfirman

      I think you are talking about your dates and not weather. I think I read something in there about ‘break up’. And there was that bit about how it got different in high school with the nights getting a lot warmer. Yes!

    • Kite flying weather. Years ago that was a theme in San Jose that I remember.

  • Charlie B

    Now that the first annual Weather West Tioga Pass opening prediction contest is officially closed (Dr. Swain did not join, which is most disappointing), it is time to turn our attention to the First Annual Weather West Memorial Day photo contest. The goal is to post the BEST picture of your fun long weekend adventures with a weather theme. By way of example, below is a picture of my view contemplating the trees in Graeagle that are finally satisfied with a great winters drink. Judging will be by consensus Monday evening, so click away! https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/a2e57e88c188d946c4b4e43998027bc89c95a17613d51dba9388b2ac01eb5d66.jpg

  • BerryessaSage
    • annette johnson

      Good job! Great comparison pictures. You were even able to get your side view mirror in the same spot. So good to see all that water ?

    • Thirstier Nick (Santa Maria)

      Wow, what an amazing recovery.

    • Pfirman

      It is pretty shallow really, kind of just an over-blown marsh much of the time. I have canoed on it. The low speed limit makes for pleasant boating.

      Swimming in Cache Creek is best done when the water is flowing from Indian Valley and not Clear Lake, heh.

  • Great Winter of 2017 (SMC)

    All the people who are talking about this warm up and saying the marine layer will have an impact on coastal locations during the heatwave, you are correct. Not suppose to get above 75 for the rest of May and possibly not above 80 for the next 15 days! this is gonna be a well below average May I can tell you for my location!

    • FolsomPrisonBlues

      Even with the heatwave the temps are forecast to be in the low to mid 90’s in Folsom. That is not too bad actually.

      • Great Winter of 2017 (SMC)

        Suppose to be 18-25 degrees cooler here, east a couple miles from Santa Cruz Mountains

  • Charlie B

    4 wheel dog capability with high ground clearance is helpful on Lakes Basin trails this weekend. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/20f24bad0bb96d2803af1536216ef70ad4884b8cb7f2d1635856444cf22cb419.jpg

    • Tuolumne

      The standard limited-slip differentials and mud + snow tires also come in handy.

    • Bombillo1

      Cool weather coat is also good to have.

  • Craig Matthews

    SSTs along immediate central coast have risen 5-8 degrees in some spots thanks to the coastal eddies that brought a southerly component to the surface flow over the immediate waters, minimalizing the upwelling effects this last week. Monterey Bay buoy #42 SST is now up to 59F, where over a week ago it was 52F. Now that the flow along the central coast is reverting back to its usual nw direction, it wont take long for those SSTs to drop back down to upper 40’s-low 50’s again, brrrrr.

    • ConcepcionImmaculadaPantalones

      Sharks. So many sharks out in the water up and down the darn coast.

  • PRCountyNative

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/3b7d52b51f129fbd6d82ae448cb4afd5a5f1554e5afe673b2aa8dc7674709896.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/07f38c4f56f5bcc36f5bc9cdaeda79a14e9fbe0282a264edc3b6e4456cb37b19.jpg

    WW MD PC entry:

    When the Big H appears in the spring, the NW winds blow, and the NE Pacific surface water goes in motion. Clear cool water appears and along with the sun starts an explosion of growth. Weird day clear at the coast cloudy inland all morning.

    • Craig Matthews

      Nice! You picked a good day to do that. Stratus layer mixed out nicely, and air quality is great.

    • Bombillo1

      Dude, you are an evolutionary throwahead..

  • 82/83 El Nino Baby (San Jose)

    I’m curious how many people want to support the cause to lower greenhouse gases, but not the other things that tend to be attached to climate change agendas?

    For example, a the push for globalism.

    https://twitter.com/AntonWSJ/status/868452823427624960

    • HighWater

      Screw Merkel! She needs to pay her NATO BILL, FIRST!!

    • tomocean

      If by globalization, you mean a concerted global effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, then I believe that would be the only way possible to make any meaningful impact. We’re all facing the same repercussions if we don’t.

      • 82/83 El Nino Baby (San Jose)

        That sounds great. But if it mean in any way giving up country rights to a higher order, like the UN or similar, for supposed “good of all”, I say no thanks.

  • gray whale

    Pretty sweet Anvil looking due east from my house north of placerville. Nothing showing on radar yet. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/e9468ba533dadb82a1af477bee778b36b169482d8c3f54e2958af5ab3424f876.jpg

  • CHeden

    Almost choked on my icecube when I saw this from the GFS out in the LR.
    Normally, not worth a second thought as to possibilities, but in looking at the entire 2 week lead-up period, beginning around the middle of next week, the North Pacific wants to gradually set up a strengthening zonal flow with possible two long-fetch jet flows that reach the west coast being depicted. Not going into a lot of detail ATTM given the extreme nature of the setup, but certainly something to monitor…and given this pattern is so similar to the on/off pattern we saw most of the Winter that brought us our heaviest precip, it’s tough to totally discount the possibility of another event. Here are some graphs in the LR showing precip and upper and mid layer flow patterns.
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/6abab9db766a545b43450ab9ccb14607321a75333f69eb5b88c62f012a136652.gif https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/4bd6bb2d22058dbe228460a95c7932f60f410cfaee921b2c9a0ab08f0e5c59cd.gif https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/1f74f38664afd030de387e78f9e969dcd72d0fa6e5cea5b299e2ec323e140654.gif

    • Wow it’s not a 384hr. LOL I spit out my beer. That does kinda look like a winter thingy. Hope you’re having a good weekend

      • CHeden

        T’anks.. looking over my back deck at the ultra-green oaks in the gully below…working on my second Scotch….temp 85F. Pretty clear air so Shasta is sparkling. Weed cutting is done for the year (took three cuttings this Spring before the grass finally dried out).
        Just another day in paradise, I guess.
        Hope yer having a good one, too.

    • Bombillo1

      1.25″ could buy us another 30 days of no forest fires. I’ll take it..

    • alanstorm

      Holy CRAP.
      I guess I’ll be cutting the grass again. Again. Again- aw screw it!

    • Great Winter of 2017 (SMC)

      How come I don’t see this on TropicaltidBits

  • CHeden

    Well, the LR GFS and my Scotch apparently wore off at the same time, as this morning the low and screaming jet I wrote about last evening has been replaced by a well defined Rex Block.
    While the 06Z run is not not the same precip producer as earlier runs, it is still worthy of note that it’s still a pseudo winter-time pattern redo….and as we all remember, the models had a terrible time dealing with this exact same setup this year.
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/f44c58afe1d932a239e0c057fc95bb6fe068488a30c5807cc0370f347ede5f1e.gif

    • Pfirman

      So scotch that Scotch toast as precip becomes toast?

      • CHeden

        kinda sorta something like that…Lol!

    • Great Winter of 2017 (SMC)

      I have rain showers in the forecast for Wednesday!

  • mattzweck

    not much going on here high desert Lancaster area. Typical spring weather. I’ll be down in L.A. tomorrow with my gf meeting her grandma before her grandma passes away.

  • Charlie B

    Frazier Falls is one of the better Northern California waterfalls. 176′. Road to the trail was clogged with drifts and downed trees. I was the only one there mid morning. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/b5498be9cb90a5bc1814def5329749f92789c74971a87de6604fb87e28a43a7e.jpg

  • Charlie B

    Oh, and here are the Sierra Buttes from Sardine Lake boathouse. There is an old fire lookout st the very top that has stupendous views. I suspect it will be awhile for that trail (which includes a portion of the PCT) to be passable. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/955bbba57b1cda910060fa1b528fa365f3dd9b5b2549d4f949779253556b4b58.jpg

    • matthew

      I tried the Buttes last June and could not make it through…had to wait until mid July. It will lokely be late July or early August before it is hikeable this year. Spectacular hike for anyone that has not yet been there.

      • Tazmanian

        use your snow shoes or skis the rest of the way

  • Tazmanian

  • rob b-Truckee/East Bay

    Went for a walk this morning. This is one of the homes with major damage from the winter. Partial deck/railing collapse, ice dam took out one of the picture windows, and Ice also tore away part of the metal roof. Busy this me for the trades with all the insurance work. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/433bd996c42cdd58d673e249e7ee51b25e1080ae5d4a65d3a37d63fdfa27eded.jpg

    • inclinejj

      Ouch. Chances are if the ice dams did that much damage water got inside the house also. Many owners never even come up during the winter to keep an eye on their houses. Did you know anything about the situation and or the owners?

  • MetaGhost (Berkeley)

    Afternoon over South Lake today. Spectacular weather and with a little planning, it’s possible to avoid the crowds.

  • Rainmaker (San Jose)

    high pressure system building in starting next weekend. Looks like it will stay in the upper 80’s so far. I’m done with 90’s for awhile.

  • DayHoe Herald

    Here’s my contest photo: unambiguous evidence of a desperately needed wet winter — note the downed fence + the now languid little Putah Creek to the left in one of the photos — was outside the banks for quite awhile — location is southeast of Davis. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/ca868b9942b867e9b4eadd9deb8e6846945b74852eb77527f5efc42a04a8d2e2.jpg
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/b1fc88fae1cc998c6af2c8c3d0cae48cbc1b3863030e5e4a061992a8caee346d.jpg
    Disquis somehow decided I am now ‘Dayhoe Herald’ by randomly changing me to an old handle that was lying dormant in the Googleplex — maybe Yolo Hoe will pop up again at some point.

    • Pfirman

      I was wondering about that. Thought you were Mrs. Hoe for a while, heh.

  • happ [Los Angeles]

    Warmer today but more troughiness this week should strengthen marine layer w/ possible drizzle.

    81/ 56

  • Charlie B

    It just poured in Graeagle for 20 minutes. Almost screwed up my dinner. I persevered.

  • Fairweathercactus

    The only model run from the GFS that was any good was the 6z. The rest of them had some sort of strange cutoff low dancing around the area. One June where we had 4 or 5 upper level cutoffs and 2 of them brought thunderstorms to the Whittier area.

    Also cactus is enjoying the warmer weather so its skating time till Fall comes back around.

  • saw1979

    Spent the day in Hetch Hetchy, just beautiful! The power of the water through the dam was incredible! Part of the trail had a warning due to the volume of water coming off the falls and onto the trail, hubby and son braved it…me, I sat back and watched. They were drenched! A very enjoyable day in our beautiful Sierra!
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/6297ebc219320cf68d0e65c0934fa66b1c295273b9a837321223227cce606c3d.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/413343f074bc69c918fe2f35a5f76e3739fc30d831c6c1748c394d0080cbf3bd.jpg

  • saw1979
    • annette johnson

      They loaded fine…cool pics!

  • Tazmanian

    for once this may be a below normal summer has far has temper gos yes we will still see mid 90s too may be low 100s at times but it will not last that long has high temper will cool right back down tooo the mid 70s and low 80s

  • inclinejj

    One of my favorite places to get away from the crowds and tourists at Tahoe was Incline Lake. It was on the map and private property but if you knew someone you get a pass.

    So for years of having out little spot we get wind a couple people below the dam started making noise that the Dam wasn’t safe and wanted it drained. Sure enough the lake was drained and turned into a marsh.

    These people most have known people high up cause this took place in less than a year.

    I have to look at my Moms for thise photos.

    • Bombillo1

      There are no restrictions on draining a lake on private property. In fact DWR charges a fee for having a dam so draining your lake absolves you of the fee. Public/municipal dams pay too but it the taxpayer paying so no one gets excited. Fee is supposedly the cost for inspections. I pay $750.00 a year and haven’t seen an inspector in 2 years. 19′ dam with about 400 acre feet that would flood an 80 acre meadow on my own ranch if there was a 100% catastrophic failure. No threat to anyone. Meanwhile the tallest earthen dam in the country almost fails with spillway not having been checked since 2006! No sense of proportionality, disincentivising water conservation and fee mining people with stock pond size empoundments. This is the other side of runaway government which makes me cautious about all things government are good mentality.

      • Tuolumne

        The state made multiple errors with the Oroville Dam facilities, but they have been doing annual inspections. OTOH, the 2015 spillway inspection was from a distance which is obviously inadequate. There were also minor repairs to the spillway in 2013. The important issue is that they didn’t adequately inspect the underpinnings of the spillway over the years, so they didn’t find the voids that eventually caused the failure.

        One could just as readily critique private-sector errors such as the Deepwater Horizon explosion, which happened the same night the rig crew was celebrating their great safety record. The point to keep in mind is that continued apparent success breeds complacency, which then leads to cutting corners on safety measures. People get away with cutting corners for a while, until suddenly their luck runs out and disaster looms. This is a lesson for all of us.

        • Bombillo1

          I appreciate your response but I must say there are thousands of no impact tiny impoundments principally on farms and ranches, that the state is very quick to collect fees from. Always raising the specter of the Saint Francis failure as the no rebuttal justification. No matter that the state engineer signed off on that and it was a giant dam/lake with huge drainage capture. Apples being applied to grapes mentality. I would like to know, after having received a record amount of rain this year, how many farm/stock ponds failed and caused off site damage???

  • AlTahoe
  • happ [Los Angeles]

    Stratus has cleared w/ scattered cirrus overhead thanks to the weak low to the southwest. This type of set-up is ideal during summer esp when strong high pressure sets up over the West Coast. During an otherwise relatively hot/ humid summer, July 2015 is a good example of a sustained pattern of southwest troughs under-cutting the western ridge [similar to current conditions in PacificNW]. The heat is worse in Seattle than LA. There have been a few fires [Mandeville canyon] but dew points in the upper 50’s help.

    Photo taken around sunrise [courtesy of Rick Dickert/ Channel 11]
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/d2fbdeb6cbfd8bc20568a1efd6bd4e83ad972c5c56b37bb6fdbb1326ccc08b0b.jpg

    • Tuolumne

      Thanks for the stratus report. 😉

      • happ [Los Angeles]

        That’s all there is to report along the coast! lol

        • Tuolumne

          June gloom looms!

  • Cap’n

    Still a little bit of snow above Crater Lake at 7,050 ft yesterday, May 29th. Shasta and the Cascades did good this winter, hope to get a good picture of her heading south in a week. Camped last night at 3,900 ft, Frog Lake beneath Mt Hood and was surprised at how much snow there was at our site that low.

    Snow porn photo though not California, Crater Lake, Discovery Point yesterday.

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/a4f2d773d06694a94090a40c83be3bbd64d1911f7e818811d9f6b6619264874f.jpg

  • T’storm98 (Orcutt, CA)

    Slight chance of some isolated showers/t’storms for the SB and VT County mountains this afternoon.

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/11358de82a21bcac3199ea9de4974764d8963e19bceb99dcf89a29bd2ba74859.png

  • Working on a new post today, despite the relative lack of weather at the moment. 🙂

    • Tuolumne

      The only way we won’t have any weather is if our atmosphere goes missing. I hope that’s not in the works, as we do prefer being able to breathe.

    • weathergeek100

      Makes me curious on what the topic will be!

  • Tazmanian

    i think with of the snow we have in the mts right now still i think some of it above 9,000 too 10,000ft will last all summer

  • sezwhom
  • AlTahoe

    Just an fyi spyware popped up on my android when I went to this page today.
    On another note this guy just walked in front of my house and is now in a tree eating a bird’s nest https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/d4d3886f92c2f3aef5d517764f332913cb5ce8ab67cbb4dcc7ed63c5f3a2a903.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/e75aafc655f5c9ab4270e837558e3c3fcfda385fe1f5af8881a3ee80931d8e76.jpg

    • Jim

      Thats a healthy looking bear…our vacation home in Myers in Christmas Valley got broke into 3 times in 2 years a few years back…luckily hasnt happened again…

    • Bombillo1

      If I saw a person that had that proportionality I would say that there was an overabundance of food in the environment… Great photo nicely showing the almost human form of the feet!